Launching Copyright the Card Game – Canadian edition… en français!

Mélanie Brunet and Marie-Ève Truchon (courtesy of France Séguin-Couture/ABO-Franco)

Mélanie Brunet (@MelanieBrunet) is the Copyright Services Librarian at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, Canada) where she is responsible for copyright education and outreach with faculty, students and staff. She is a member of the Canadian Copyright Card Game Group and participated in the adaptation and design of English-language Canadian edition of the game. As an extension of her copyright responsibilities, she also has a keen interest in open licences, textbook costs, and open educational resources. She is currently a member of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries Open Education Working Group (CARL OEWG).

Marie-Ève Truchon (@metruchon) is the Copyright Technician at the Bureau du droit d’auteur at Université Laval (Quebec City, Canada) where she offers copyright information sessions and consultation services to students, professors, staff, and journal editors, and processes permission requests. She is currently completing a Bachelor of Civil Law, with a focus on intellectual property.

When a group of copyright specialists met during the 2017 ABC Copyright Conference to discuss adapting Copyright the Card Game to the Canadian context, the possibility of creating a French version was also raised so the game could be played in both of Canada’s official languages. Two years later, we are proud to unveil the Jeu de cartes du droit d’auteur – version canadienne!

The first group to play the Jeu de cartes du droit d’auteur – version canadienne! (courtesy of France Séguin-Couture/ABO-Franco)

Shortly after the official launch of the Canadian edition of the game on this site in December 2018, a small group of French-speaking Canadian copyright specialists got to work translating the game for a francophone audience. We closely followed the French version of the Copyright Act, which greatly facilitated the translation process. Then we tried to simplify the language whenever possible.

While we kept the look of the original Canadian version with its formatting, colours and icons from the Noun Project, we adopted a new logo. We also made corrections and updates and included new scenarios. As with the version in English, we labeled the Exceptions cards as either “Basic” or “Advanced” to offer some flexibility depending on the audience’s level of familiarity with copyright. We also incorporated an optional scoring rubric indicating the minimum number of cards expected for each round, which helps speed up the game while leaving time for discussion and makes it possible to play five rounds in about 75 minutes.

On May 27, we had the pleasure of hosting the Jeu de cartes du droit d’auteur for the first time as the closing activity at the inaugural ABO-Franco conference (French section of the Ontario Library Association) held in Ottawa. Some 20 enthusiastic participants representing public, school and academic libraries as well as non-profit organizations formed three teams. Players were especially interested in learning more about fair dealing and library exceptions and it made for some stimulating conversations.

Merci aux participants pour leurs commentaires et leurs questions! And thank you to Jane and Chris for inspiring us with the original game and for hosting this version on their website.

The team behind the Jeu de cartes du droit d’auteur is:

Mélanie Brunet, Copyright Services Librarian, University of Ottawa

Dominique Lapierre, Manager, Bureau du droit d’auteur, Université Laval

Thomas Rouleau, Copyright Officer and Manager, University of Ottawa

Marie-Ève Truchon, Copyright Technician, Bureau du droit d’auteur, Université Laval

with the help of Cynthia Lisée (Université du Québec à Montréal) who reviewed the translation and Amélie Tremblay (Université Laval) who designed the new logo.

We are really delighted to host the French Canadian version of the game on the Copyright the Card Game website and grateful to Mélanie and her team for this blog post. 

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